10 Reasons to Visit Moundville Archeological Park

Referred to as “The Big Apple of the 14th Century,” Moundville Archaeological Park is one of the premiere Native American sites in the country. Once a power community, Moundville was the largest city north of Mexico. Located just outside of Tuscaloosa on the Black Warrior River, the park encompasses more than 300 acres and 29 flat-topped mounds. Today, visitors get to see the how the Mississippians lived nearly 800 years ago on this land. There are so many reasons why a visit here is a must!

Jones Archeological Museum: Opened in 1939 when the site was simply known as the Mound State Monument, the Jones Archeological Museum greeted visitors for many years before the University of Alabama took on an effort to revive and redefine the museum. The result was a $5 million renovation in 1999. The museum that guests see today was opened in 2010 and offers some of the most stunning artifacts found on site. Their state-of-the-art technology and history exhibits tell the story of the civilization for visitors from all over the world. 

Campground: Most visitors do not get the pleasure of staying on the site of such a significant historical site but that is exactly what is offered here! Even though reservations are only made on-site, the campground has 5 sites with electric, water, and sewer hookups, 24 sites with electric and water hookups, and 5 primitive sites with no utilities. However, there is a bathhouse on site! What a neat place to spend a few days!

Facility Rental: The Nelson B. Jones Conference Center is not only the place many special events are held by the park, but it is also available for rental for the public! The center overlooks the Black Warrior River and contains a full kitchen, fireplace, sound system, internet, and a video projector. This is a perfect location with a stunning backdrop for any of your special occasions.

Native American Festival: Scheduled for October 12-15 of this year, the event gives guests an opportunity to get a better understanding of the Native American culture through performers, demonstrations, and living history teachers. The festival will

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