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Mississippi Needs Tax Credits For Children and Working Families, Not Tax Cuts For The Rich 

The legislative session has begun, and some of my colleagues in the Legislature, joined by Gov. Reeves, are pushing to expand what is already the state’s largest-ever income tax cut for the wealthy.

Despite what some of my colleagues claim, these tax cuts will only help the rich get richer at the expense of Mississippi’s working families and children. They will not grow our economy. In fact, they’ll actually leave us vulnerable to tougher, longer economic downturns at a time when economists and experts say a recession is likely looming

When the economy slips, people lose their jobs. As times get tough, most people spend less. That means less revenue for businesses and for our state, which makes layoffs for teachers and cuts to health care and other public services more likely. It also makes it harder to provide things like unemployment benefits and temporary aid to ensure families can pay for things like food and housing. 

The harm of these ill-conceived tax cuts is acute during a recession, but even without one, we know income-tax giveaways to the rich will worsen our already sky-high economic and racial inequality. Tax giveaways to the wealthy also mean less money for schools, clean water, roads and hospitals—all of which are vital to the success, health, and prosperity of kids, families and businesses. 

Make Mississippi Families and Businesses Stronger

Because Mississippi’s wealthy are more likely to be white, and those with low incomes are more likely to be people of color—a legacy of our history—these costly tax cuts will also make racial disparities worse. There are better solutions. 

“The harm of these ill-conceived tax cuts is acute during a recession, but even without one, we know income-tax giveaways to the rich will worsen our already sky-high economic and racial inequality,” Rep. Zakiya Summers writes. Photo by Kelly Sikke on Unsplash

We must recognize that our tax code already asks for far more from minimum-wage and middle-income earners than it does from those who are paid the most. The bottom 80% of Mississippi taxpayers (those earning below $77,500 per year) pay a larger share of their income in state

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